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Palmer amaranth: A new weed threat to watch out for

[8/23/2016] Lisa Behnken, Fritz Breitenbach, Jeff Gunsolus, Phyllis Bongard, Liz Stahl

Minnesota Crop News has published an article on palmer amaranth.

Sulfoxaflor found to be less harmful to beneficial predators of soybean aphids

[8/17/2016] A new study published by Anh Tran, Tavvs Alves & Bob Koch, has found Sulfoxaflor to be less harmful to beneficial predators of soybean aphids.

Reducing risk to pollinators in and near soybean

[8/10/2016] Insecticides are an important tool in the IPM toolbox for protecting crop yields from pests. However, we need to keep in mind that many of the insecticides we use to manage crop pests are also toxic to beneficial insects, such as predators and pollinators. This article will provide an overview of some considerations for reducing the risk of impacting pollinators (e.g., bees and some flies) when foliar insecticide applications are made to crops. 

Featured IPM Programs

cabbage sampling

Bed Bugs

bedbugsLet's Beat the Bug website is an excellent resource for finding information on preventing, controlling, and treating bed bug problems.

Fruit IPM

SWD on purple raspberryFruitEdge is a new site that features up-to-date information on key insect pests of Minnesota's fruit crops. 

Vegetable IPM

cabbage looperVisit VegEdge to view vegetable pest & beneficial insect profiles, as well as pest infestation updates.

Field Crop IPM

Rosemount fieldSee the latest on insect, disease and weed pest management for corn, soybean, and other crops on the Extension Crop Production website.

IPM and Invasive Species

BMSBThe MITPPC website provides current information about the University of Minnesota's terrestrial invasive species research efforts.

MN IPM Buzz - Blog

Sustainable pest management updates, research & policy.

Corn Earworm Pressure Remains High in MN: New CEW Forecast & Risk updates

CEW moths in a Hartstack trap

[8/23/2016] Unlike the past 2 years, where late-season Corn Earworm (CEW) immigration events have been late to less frequent, we have experienced several significant incoming flights this summer. Moreover, because the southern states that provide our source moths are reporting record high numbers in all key crops (sorghum, cotton, corn), the numbers we are seeing at most of our southern MN locations are above average to high. 

CEW Alert Continues for Southern Minnesota

CEW moths

[8/10/2016] As with last week's catch at Rosemount and Blue Earth, Corn Earworm moth catch continues to increase at these locations. At Blue Earth, trap catch went up to 185 on 8/4 and 198 on 8/5. Also, noted in the Blue Earth graph, the flight this year is much higher than the past two years (essentially back to a more "normal" flight); this increase is not surprising given the recent Low pressure system that moved through the state. In brief, the Lows typically bring warm/humid air from southern states northward. As these fronts converge with a High pressure front, this typically results in a rainfall event, and facilitates both the movement (migration) of insects northward, and their deposition wherever these fronts converge; thus can be spotty depending on how the fronts converge, and over which states, etc.

Corn Earworm Alert – Southern Minnesota

Checking a CEW Hartstack Trap
CEW moth

[8/4/2016] Given recent trends in recent trap catches of CEW moths in pheromone traps, sweet corn now silking (early, peak and early brown silk) may be at risk to egg-lay, and should be scouted, and/or traps checked more frequently this week.  


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